January 13, 2022

The daily bookmark

January 13, 2022 edition. Get your finely curated tweets right here, hot and not so hot off the metaphorical presses

The daily bookmark

There are so many things I've come to dislike about Twitter. But I stay on because it offers me unparalleled access to a range of thinkers whose ideas constantly enrich my own reflections.

One of my major frustrations is that Twitter appears to be deliberately designed to stymie any use of the platform other than endless scrolling of your timeline. While the bookmark function allows you to archive tweets, there is no way to review those bookmarked tweets except by scrolling backwards. This is extremely onerous once a substantial backlog builds up. And the search function (not very good to begin with) doesn't work on your bookmarks.

Moreover, as I discovered rather belatedly (today), Twitter simply deletes your oldest bookmarks at a certain point. After much labourious scrolling, I can't find anything from before March 2020.

I've come to the conclusion that posting here a daily roundup of bookmark-worthy tweets, old and new, tagged according to subject is the best way to create a usable archive.

I have some some serious catching up to do, so here are a half dozen.

Old gold

Three food-related posts from the past:

Secrets of guerilla cuisine

How do you feed a vast army, living in the bush? With a lot of ingenuity and foodwork shared equally between the genders.

“It is a universe,” says food anthropologist Ramiro Delgado Salazar of the University of Antioquia. “They sow, they cultivate, they gather, steal, take, give, they have all sorts of transactions of food, in this weaving to feed a whole bunch of guerrilla rebels.”

Land of hickory milk

Food should not be a commodity

Catch of the day(s)

Three more recent tweets on the topic of disability:

Normalizing disability aids

Versions of this tweet have been circulating for quite a while now, but I appreciate the pithiness of this one.

Everyday eugenics

Part of a brief thread on how the recently disabled struggle with the social implications of their new status. The implicit connection of ill/disabled and unworthy/burden to society latent in the ableism that pervades our society makes clear that eugenics isn't just some fringe ideology.

Chronic illness and disability

A really interesting long thread featuring multiple voices articulating their sense of how to define these two terms. Many agree that "disability" is more a social status (i.e., outward facing) where as illness is more a personal state of being (inward facing):